MonasteryQuest™ Pt 2: The Tudor cathedrals that almost were   Leave a comment

Stained Glass Attitudes

In lockdown 2020, I came across a list of every monastery dissolved under the government of Henry VIII in 1535-40. My mission, which I chose to accept (because what else was I going to do) was to find the location and condition of every English monastery and its church. This. Is MonasteryQuest™.

It is reasonably well known that the dissolution of the monasteries completed in 1540 resulted in six new cathedrals in England. These were the first new dioceses since 1133 (when the Augustinian Priory at Carlisle was made a cathedral), and the last until 1836 (when Ripon Minster was elevated to finally officially take the burden off York for the rising industrial towns). These were Chester, Gloucester, Oxford (shifted site, see below), Peterborough, Bristol and (for a decade) Westminster. What is much less well-known is that around 1540 the Crown was contemplating converting some –…

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Posted July 12, 2020 by Aadil in Aadil's Astronomy Space and Travels

MonasteryQuest™ Pt 2: The Tudor cathedrals that almost were   Leave a comment

via MonasteryQuest™ Pt 2: The Tudor cathedrals that almost were

Posted July 12, 2020 by Aadil in Aadil's Astronomy Space and Travels

MonasteryQuest™ Pt 1: the twenty richest houses at the dissolution   Leave a comment

Stained Glass Attitudes

In lockdown 2020, I came across a list of every monastery dissolved under the government of Henry VIII in 1535-40. My mission, which I chose to accept (because what else was I going to do) was to find the location and condition of every English monastery and its church. This. Is MonasteryQuest™.

This is first installment of the write-up of my frankly silly partly performative live-tweet thread to find the archaeological knowledge for every monastic site in the 1534/5 survey of potential Crown revenue, the Valor Ecclesiasticus, after the Act of Supremacy was passed by parliament to make the English monarch head of the Church in his kingdom. The Valor is, incredibly, to my knowledge, not available complete online in any form (including scans), but I found a table of all the monasteries’ values, excluding mendicant friaries and obviously non-coventual granges (and mistakes on behalf of the original…

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Posted June 27, 2020 by Aadil in Aadil's Astronomy Space and Travels

MonasteryQuest™ Pt 1: the twenty richest houses at the dissolution   Leave a comment

via MonasteryQuest™ Pt 1: the twenty richest houses at the dissolution

Posted June 27, 2020 by Aadil in Aadil's Astronomy Space and Travels

Bombay: Exploring the Jewish Urban Heritage by Dr. Shaul Sapir   Leave a comment

via Bombay: Exploring the Jewish Urban Heritage by Dr. Shaul Sapir

Posted February 5, 2020 by Aadil in Aadil's Astronomy Space and Travels

Looking For Nothing In Gwalior   Leave a comment

via Looking For Nothing In Gwalior

Posted May 13, 2019 by Aadil in Aadil's Astronomy Space and Travels

Looking For Nothing In Gwalior   1 comment

Kevin Standage

Gwalior is rightly famous for its majestic cliff-top fort, the awe-inspiring Jain monuments that have been hewn from the hillside, and for the ancient temples of Sas Mabu and Teli Ka. Tourists flock to Gwalior in their thousands to see these monuments, probably unaware that it is also the home to a simple carving that is the oldest of its type in India, and is arguably the greatest conceptual leap in the history of mathematics…the zero.

Recently installed signposts now help tourists find this historic location. Halfway up the cobbled pathway on the eastern approach to the fort is the small and unassuming Chaturbhuj Temple.

The temple has been completely carved out of the rock face, and thanks to an inscription in the sanctum we know that it was constructed in the year 876 AD. It is this inscription that also contains one of the earliest known uses of the…

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Posted May 13, 2019 by Aadil in Aadil's Astronomy Space and Travels

Monks, Monasteries and Murals – A Photo Story on Puri’s Two Legendary Mathas   Leave a comment

via Monks, Monasteries and Murals – A Photo Story on Puri’s Two Legendary Mathas

Posted September 6, 2018 by Aadil in Aadil's Astronomy Space and Travels

Monks, Monasteries and Murals – A Photo Story on Puri’s Two Legendary Mathas   Leave a comment

VIRASAT - E - HIND FOUNDATION

Puri, the abode of Lord Jagannath is widely celebrated as a supreme Hindu Tirtha for its legendary Jagannath cult. Everyday Puri is visited by thousands of devotees from all over India for darshan of the Hindu Trinity at Jagannath Temple.

The present Jagannath Temple may be a 12th century structure testifying the highest achievement of Kalinga School Architecture, but the celebration of Puri or Srikshetra as a Hindu Tirtha goes back to much earlier time. For example Gobardhana Matha located in Swarga Dwara had been founded by Adi Sankaracharya in 8th Century CE as a centre of learning and culture. From then on mathas or monasteries have been playing an important role in performing seva or duty for Lord Jagannath. There are a large number of mathas belonging to different sects located around Jagannath Temple. Mahantas head these monastic institutions, who are also the spiritual preceptors of many…

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Posted September 6, 2018 by Aadil in Aadil's Astronomy Space and Travels

Mumbai’s Hidden Museums #3   Leave a comment

Walking Mumbai

Text contributed by Tamara Rasquinha (IG: @tamararasquinha), team Inheritage.

Kamalnayan Bajaj Art Gallery

In the unlikely centre of the city’s business hub of Nariman Point lies a humble display detailing the life of an even more humble patriarch and his family of freedom fighters – an individual, personal history of the kind that has long been overlooked in the general narrative of the independence struggle. At the Kamalnayan Bajaj Art Gallery,  photographs and handwritten correspondences trace the early life of his father Jamnalal Bajaj, the founder of the Bajaj family business. Key artefacts include rebellious letters  renouncing his inheritance and captivating photographs of Jamnalal leading a satyagraha defying a British ban on flying the national flag. 

Among the gallery’s many highlights, the photographs that struck me most are those of Jamnalal Bajaj, a wealthy businessman, opting to be a ‘C’ class prisoner and undertake arduous manual labour during his…

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Posted June 24, 2018 by Aadil in Aadil's Astronomy Space and Travels