Why I love: Simone Martini   Leave a comment

via Why I love: Simone Martini

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Posted February 25, 2018 by Aadil in Aadil's Astronomy Space and Travels

Why I love: Simone Martini   Leave a comment

Stained Glass Attitudes

Simone Martini - The Grieving St John - signed and dated 1320 (The Barber Institute, Birmingham, England) Simone Martini – The Grieving St John – dated 1320 (The Barber Institute, Birmingham, England)

Although I saw a few nice churches in Haggerston and Hackney last week, it didn’t seem quite exciting enough to write up as a blog, and this week I was far too crippled to even consider much more than a trip to Piccadilly to catch the RA’s George Bellows exhibition before it closes, so I thought I would try something a bit different. There are some things that as an Art Historian that I get very excited about, even if they are not part of my current research. Outward appearances are obviously part of the attraction, but it’s only when you really consider and study things at length that you can see how special they were in their own time. I thought I would share a few on this blog, and the first, on the

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Posted February 25, 2018 by Aadil in Aadil's Astronomy Space and Travels

Bad art in cathedrals   Leave a comment

via Bad art in cathedrals

Posted January 11, 2018 by Aadil in Aadil's Astronomy Space and Travels

Bad art in cathedrals   Leave a comment

Stained Glass Attitudes

Cathedrals used to be depositories of some of the finest works of art in the world. Then the pesky Reformation came round and stripped many of them back to the walls. What has filled the place of the original medieval artworks has, over the years, been subject to changing tastes. While the Victorians despised all classical additions, the twentieth century in turn, had a bit of a clear-out of what they found dowdy and gloomy.

So what tat should be chucked out in a fantasy aesthetic Reformation? Let’s dispense with the polite introduction that pretends this is anything other than just a list of things I don’t like, and find out!

The café paintings in Worcester chapter house

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Worcester chapter house is an immensely important monument. It’s the first in a long line of English centrally-planned chapter houses. The walls retain traces of painting, and the stone vault once contained…

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Posted January 11, 2018 by Aadil in Aadil's Astronomy Space and Travels

How to defuse the parish church crisis   Leave a comment

Stained Glass Attitudes

England’s medieval parish churches are a unique asset and a ticking timebomb. However, they are a Doomsday Device with no digital display. People thought it would blow thirty years ago. But here it is, in 2017, still ticking.

Consecration Of Rachel Treweek As The Next Bishop Of Gloucester “So glad you can join us in the Silly Hat Club, Sarah”

The maintenance of many churches spread over our green and often-pleasant land is becoming unsustainable, and the architecture and art inside is at risk. Money needs to spent on them. But where should the money come from? People often labour under the impression that the Church of England is very wealthy, indeed greedy, in that they own billions in land, only the squander it on silly hats. However, despite the size of their assets being indeed large, as much of it is indeed these rural parish churches, they can’t be monetised.

P1400072 Holy Trinity, Blythburgh (Suffolk), tower c.1330, new church…

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Posted December 31, 2017 by Aadil in Aadil's Astronomy Space and Travels

Gol Gumbaz – The Triumph of Deccani Architecture   Leave a comment

via Gol Gumbaz – The Triumph of Deccani Architecture

Posted November 7, 2017 by Aadil in Aadil's Astronomy Space and Travels

Gol Gumbaz – The Triumph of Deccani Architecture   Leave a comment

Virasat E Hind Blog

If Taj Mahal is India’s most admired artistic tomb, then the Gol Gumbaz in Bijapur that houses the grave of Muhammad Adil Shah is technologically the most advanced tomb of Medieval India. I have been to Gol Gumbaz twice before and each time there was something to be surprised about.

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The View of Gol Gumbaz in the Early Morning

Gol Gumbaz, often considered as the triumph of Deccani architecture is actually an unfinished monument. Designed by architect Yaqut of Dabul, Gol Gumbaz is a massive cube and its dome (44 m in diameter) is the second largest in the world. However, its plain surface was supposed to have been covered with a range of Persian tiles.

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An Unfinished Graffiti

Muhammad Adil Shah started building his tomb immediately after his ascent to throne in 1626 CE. His intention was to build the grandest tomb in India. The construction of the tomb…

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Posted November 7, 2017 by Aadil in Aadil's Astronomy Space and Travels